‘Smile’ by Katy Perry is a delightful pick’n’mix of sounds

Score: 8.5/10

Stream on Spotify or Apple Music

Add to playlist: ‘Never Really Over’, ‘Cry About It Later’, ‘Tucked’ 

Humbled by the hostile reception to 2017’s mildly experimental Witness, Katy Perry plays to her strengths on fifth album Smile

These twelve new songs chronicle the singer’s journey to finding her smile again, and address the clinical depression that followed her commercial wobbles with surprising candour, as illustrated by the ‘sad clown’ character Katy has adopted for the era. 

While this is ripe material for more empowerment anthems à la ‘Firework’ and ‘Roar’, Smile doesn’t abandon the coquettish streak that launched her to superstardom with ‘I Kissed A Girl’. The result is a delightful pick’n’mix of sounds, guided by themes of resilience and gratitude. 

Had a piece of humble pie / That ego check saved my life’, Katy half-raps on the title track, a strident, horn-driven salute to shifting priorities, built on an interpolation of ‘Jamboree’ by Naughty By Nature. Bizarrely, early vinyl pressings include a superior edit featuring Diddy.

Many factors played into Katy’s 2017 backlash. Some were petty (would it have even happened if she hadn’t dismantled her pin-up image?) but it didn’t help that Witness was severely lacking in the carefree uptempos that were once Katy’s speciality. 

Almost by way of apology, the record opens with a one-two-three punch of pop perfection: last May’s ‘Never Really Over’, the melancholic 80s synthpop of ‘Cry About It Later’, and the European house of ‘Teary Eyes’. 

Dance bops will woo the gays, but Katy needs the soccer moms back on side too, so Smile is obliged to lean into Adult Contemporary with mixed results.

‘Daisies’ is a dreamy folk-pop number about following your dreams. The sparse arrangement of ‘Resilient’ clashes with an intense vocal. On the beautiful, gospel-inspired ‘Only Love’, Katy shares how she would spend her last day on Earth: ‘I’d call my mother and tell her I’m sorry / I never call her back / I’d pour my heart and soul out into a letter / and send it to my dad.

Smile might be a little too content to rehash the winning pop formula of Teenage Dream – which celebrates its 10th anniversary this week – but the fact that Katy Perry can pull it off without that record’s sonic architects Dr. Luke and Max Martin is certainly worth smiling about.

Katy Perry burns rubber on new single ‘Harleys In Hawaii’

harleys in hawaii.jpg

Are those the macho revs of a Harley-Davidson motorcycle you hear? Or the enthused purrs of KatyCats the world over? 

‘Harleys In Hawaii’, the latest single from Katy Perry’s yet-to-be-announced fifth studio album, promises both. 

Produced by Charlie Puth and Johann Carlsson, it’s a tantalising midtempo built on guitar plucks and woozy synths. Giving her sexiest performance in years, Katy invites her lover – who may or may not hold a Hells Angels membership card – to join her on a tropical escapade. According to the fanciful lyrics, she apparently makes this suggestion on a rather humdrum Sunday, because that’s what being a millionaire is like. 

‘Harleys’ bridges the optimism of summer with the cool resistance of autumn, lying somewhere between Lana Del Rey’s ‘Doin’ Time’ and Camila Cabello’s ‘Havana’. Like the latter’s now-iconic ‘Havana-na-na-na’ hook, the titular island state is immortalised with its own equivalent: a breathy ‘Hawaii-aii-aii’. At least it should be a hit somewhere. 

Watch Katy burn rubber in the ‘Harleys In Hawaii’ video below:

Katy Perry’s ‘Small Talk’ is an awkward single befitting an awkward career

kt-flawless2019 has been a solid showing for Katy Perry so far. Although we’re a while away from her own A Star Is Born moment, the pop icon has been steadily reestablishing her musical relevance.

First came the charmingly subtle Zedd collaboration ‘365’ on Valentine’s Day, followed by the breaktaking Top 20 hit ‘Never Really Over‘ in May, again produced by Zedd. No album has been confirmed, but there’s clearly some interest in the ‘Firework’ singer. 

Katy being Katy, however, there’s always a backlash lurking around the corner. Whatever blood magick she performed to clinch those nine #1s has lain dormant since 2014, making only a brief appearance last year to destroy the 81-year-old Catholic nun who died in court challenging the sale of a lush Los Angeles convent to Ms. Perry. RIP Sister Holzman!

The gaffe-prone star has spent the last few years harvesting karmic retributions for her expedient ascent to pop’s echelons in the late noughties, beginning with the floppage of 2017’s Witness.

This week, Josh Kloss – who turned heads as Katy’s rippled love interest in the video for ‘Teenage Dream’ nine years ago – accused her of multiple transgressions that took place during production, the most damning of which is an incident at a party where the star allegedly pulled down the model’s sweatpants to expose his penis to a crowd of people. 

The act Josh describes is an irrefutable violation, and his account of events demands an immediate and thought-out response from Katy, either publicly or in private. Yet even if this crisis is handled with the utmost sensitivity and care, there’s still the small matter of her new single being a bit shit.

Small Talk

Sexual harassment scandal pending, new single ‘Small Talk’ has a bit of momentum and goodwill to play with. The logical next step in cementing Katy’s radio renaissance would be unleashing another high-impact bop before summer fizzles out. 

Someone should probably check there isn’t a gas leak over at Capitol Records HQ, as only that could explain why they believe decidedly low-impact plinky-plonk scandipop is the horse to bet on. Admittedly, this is a new sound for Katy, but only because she was busy paddleboarding with a naked Orlando Bloom while every other popstar was driving it into the ground. 

Her attempt is interesting enough. The track wryly mocks the stilted dynamics between ex-lovers, using compact verses brimming with goofy observations to underline the singer’s nonchalance: ‘Isn’t it wild that I know your weakness? / And everybody at the party thinks that you’re the best since sliced bread’.

Assuming the bread in question is plain ol’ white, this analogy sums up the track’s flavour nicely. Co-writer and producer Charlie Puth adds pleasant touches to the sparse production (and beat boxes throughout the entire track, bless), but after 20+ plays, I can confirm that’s all ‘Small Talk’ is: pleasant.

At best, it’s a befittingly awkward single for an awkward chapter in Katy Perry’s career.